Category:The Americas

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The Americas encompass 35 sovereign nation states and 15 overseas territories and house approximately 14% of the human population in about 28% of the Earths land surface.


All nations states in the Americas with the exception of Canada, the USA, and the overseas territories are developing countries. According to the human development aggregates (UNDP, 2006), 14 countries scored within the high human development group (Antigua and Barbuda; Argentina; Bahamas; Barbados; Canada; Chile; Costa Rica; Cuba; Mexico; Panama; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Trinidad and Tobago; United States and Uruguay); 20 countries are included in the medium human development group (Belize; Bolivia; Brazil; Colombia; Dominica; Dominican Republic; Ecuador; El Salvador; Grenada; Guatemala; Guyana; Honduras; Jamaica; Nicaragua; Paraguay; Peru; Saint Lucia; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; Suriname; and Venezuela). Only Haiti falls within the Least Development Countries (LDCs).


All types of natural hazardous events occur in the Americas. From landslides to volcanic eruptions, from hurricanes to earthquakes, wildland fires, floods and drought, the Americas constitutes a multi-hazard scenario, where combined with socio-economic and environmental vulnerable conditions, results in numerous and widespread small, medium and large disasters. In the last three decades alone, an estimated 160 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean were affected by disasters associated to the occurrence of natural hazards.


For detailed information on previous disaster risk reduction activities:

Americas Regional Overview 2005-2006 (716 kb) elaborated in preparation for the 2007 Global Assessment Report.

Hyogo Framework in the Latin American Region – Priorities for Action & Initiatives (2005), and

Implementation of the HFA: Institutional Arrangement in the Great Caribbean

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